New Zealand Women’s Law Journal – Te Aho Kawe Kaupapa Ture a ngā Wāhine, Volume 5

The New Zealand Women’s Law Journal – Te Aho Kawe Kaupapa Ture a ngā Wāhine focuses on supporting and publishing scholarly research about women.

Book
NZD$ 30.00
Quantity
In Stock
Release Date: January 10, 2022
ISBN/ISSN: NZWLJ2021VOL5

Product description

The primary aims of the Journal are to promote awareness about women’s issues in the law and to support women in the New Zealand legal profession in their careers. The scope of the Journal is wide: publishing articles related to any domestic or international topic concerning women, gender perspectives and the law. The New Zealand Women’s Law Journal Trust also encourage articles that take an intersectional approach and simultaneously examine issues of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and sexual orientation. The articles and commentaries included are chosen from the work of lawyers, graduate students, and academics. For further information about the New Zealand Women’s Law Journal Trust, visit http://www.womenslawjournal.co.nz/

Features

• The only academic publication solely dedicated to publishing legal scholarship about women's issues in the law and supporting the work of women lawyers in New Zealand.
• Provides refreshing perspectives to the dialogue around issues in the legal profession.
• A new collection of essays published annually.

Related Titles

New Zealand Women’s Law Journal — Te Aho Kawe Kaupapa Ture a ngā Wāhine, Volume 4, 2020
New Zealand Women’s Law Journal — Te Aho Kawe Kaupapa Ture a ngā Wāhine, Volume 3, 2019
New Zealand Women’s Law Journal — Te Aho Kawe Kaupapa Ture a ngā Wāhine, Volume 2, 2018
New Zealand Women’s Law Journal — Te Aho Kawe Kaupapa Ture a ngā Wāhine, Volume 1, 2017

 

Table of contents

• Editorial | Kōrero Tīmatanga – Alice Anderson and Ella Maiden

• Foreword | Kupu Whakataki – Hon Kiritapu Allan

• #Metoo must not leave anyone behind – Tiana Epati

Papatūānuku is breathing

• Address to International Association of Women Judges Conference – Hon Judge Sharyn Otene

• Conceptualising mana wāhine as a legal force – Nerys Udy

• Kia kaha, kia toa, kia manawanui e: Mihi Bassett and the Auckland Women’s Prison – Mariah Hori Te Pa and Alex Gordon

• Climate change and the claiming of tino rangatiratanga – Mihiata Pirini and Rhianna Morar

Changing the narrative

• ‘Achieving gender parity in the justice sector’. Speech delivered at the 65th session of the Commission on the Status of Women: Women Delivering Justice – Hon Justice Susan Glazebrook

• Should defendants be allowed to rely on the ‘Rough sex defence’ on New Zealand trials? – Ciara Connolly

• What are the reasonable alternatives? Reflections on Ruddelle, Witehira and the application of the self-defence defence – Charlotte Agnew-Harrington and Ben Morgan

• Conscientious objection to abortion in Aotearoa New Zealand: A justifiable protection of conscience or a violation of the right to healthcare? – Prerna Handa

Still more work to be done

• The lens through which we look: What of tikanga and judicial diversity – Hon Chief Judge Christina Inglis

• A feminist, human rights and indigenous critique of the Holidays (Bereavement Leave for Miscarriage) Amendment Act 2021 – Fiona Thorp and Felicity Ware

• Emerging challenges in the implementation of pay equity law in New Zealand – Megan Vant

• New rules, same culture? Commentary on the changes to the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act (Lawyers: Conduct and Client Care) Rules 2008 – Steph Dyhrberg and Zahra McDonnell-Elmetri